Safety Assessment

Executive Summary

To demonstrate that the residual risks to people when attending activities at Kings Centre Pool organised by The Tadpoles can be considered to be As Low As Reasonably Practicable (ALARP) and either Broadly Acceptable or Tolerable an efficient and effective risk assessment of the equipment has been completed.

The results from the risk assessment show that a total of twenty-six hazards were identified. A breakdown of the twenty six risks shows that that there are:

  1. No Class A risks;
  2. No Class B risks;
  3. 13 Class C risks;
  4. 13 Class D risks.

The Safety Assessment Report concludes that on the completion of the recommendations, it is considered that the residual risk to people has the potential to be considered ALARP and either Broadly Acceptable or Tolerable.

 

Safety Responsibilities

To ensure that Tadpoles Swimming Club meet their legal obligations and demonstrate that the residual level of risk has attained a level considered ALARP and Broadly Acceptable or Tolerable or has the potential to meet ALARP targets this Safety Assessment Report has been completed.

 

Safety Objectives

The aim of this Safety Assessment Report is to allow Tadpoles Swimming Club to demonstrate that they have complied with the Safety Responsibilities identified above and to:

  1. Document the Safety Responsibilities of Tadpoles Swimming Club have been met, or where Safety Responsibilities have not been met there is adequate alternative mitigation;
  2. Demonstrate that all applicable legislation, regulations, standards have been complied with, or where areas of non-compliance are identified, ensure adequate mitigations or equivalence is in place;
  3. Demonstrate that a Risk Management Process has been completed and the residual level of risk has been identified and assessed;
  4. Identify recommendations to ensure the future safety management of the equipment will be sustained.

 

Assumptions

For the purposes of bounding the Safety Assessment Report, the following assumptions have been agreed by each stakeholder:

  1. The equipments studied are representative of those that will be used during the Tadpoles Swimming Club activities;
  2. The equipment will only be deployed and used for those activities for which it is designed;
  3. Operation will only be carried out by trained people;
  4. The equipment will be correctly maintained.

Considered Risks cover the following areas:

  • Arrival and departure
  • Changing
  • Pool entry and exit
  • Pool activity

A Tadpole is a member of the Tadpoles Swimming Club who attends the Club to benefit from the water therapy services provided.

A Volunteer is a member of the Tadpoles Swimming Club who attends the club to provide support and assistance to the Tadpoles.

A Carer is the primary care-giver for a Tadpole, who attends the Club with the Tadpole in order to provide support and assistance to the Tadpole.

The Session Leader, who must be a volunteer member, is the individual who has responsibility for the overall management of a Tadpoles Swimming Club session.

1. Arrival and departure

Serial Risk Caused By S L C
1 Trips Obstacles
Trailing cables/pipes
Changes in floor level
Poor levels and slopes in the car park
Stairs
Changes in light levels
Equipment not stowed away correctly
2 4 C
2 Slips Wet floor Slippery surfaces Icy conditions 2 4 C
3 Collisions Unfamiliar environment Lack of supervision 1 4 C
4 Injury during manual handling Brakes not applied to wheelchair
Unpredictable behaviour by Tadpole
Lack of preparation Poor technique
1 3 D
5 Other

Key:

  • S = Severity (see table below)
  • L = Likelihood (see table below)
  • C = Class (Calculated using the Matrix of Severity and Likelihood, annex, Table A.3
Severity Likelihood
1 = Negligible 1 = Incredible
2 = Marginal 2 = Improbable
3 = Critical 3 = Remote
4 = Catastrophic 4 = Occasional
5 = Probable
6 = Frequent

 

2. Changing

Serial Risk Caused By S L C
1 Trips Obstacles
Trailing cables/pipes
Changes in floor level
Stairs and sloping floors
Changes in light levels
Equipment not stowed away correctly
Mats
2 4 C
2 Slips Wet floor
Wet Tadpole
Slippery surfaces
Dirty surfaces
Access through shower area
2 4 C
3 Collisions Unfamiliar environment
Lack of supervision
Members of public exiting changing area
during changeover period
Narrow entrances for wheelchairs
Fire doors closing during use
1 4 C
4 Injury during hoist
operation
Moving parts
Unpredictable behaviour by Tadpole
Equipment failure
Equipment Misuse by Carer/Volunteer
Inexperience of Carer/Volunteer
1 3 D
5 Injury during changing
bed operation
Moving parts
Unpredictable behaviour by Tadpole
Equipment failure
Equipment Misuse by Carer/Volunteer
Inexperience of Carer/Volunteer
1 3 D
6 Slipping out/off of
Equipment (hoists,
Shower chairs, beds)
Wet equipment
Wet Tadpole
Equipment Misuse by Carer/Volunteer
Inexperience of Carer/Volunteer
2 3 D
7 Injury during manual handling Changing bed set to wrong height
Brakes not applied to changing chair
Unpredictable behaviour by Tadpole
Lack of preparation
Poor technique
1 3 D
8 Scalding Shower temperature not correct
Tap temperature not correct
1 3 D
9 Infection Soiled equipment
Poor hygiene
Outdoor shoes
1 2 D
10 Other

Key:

  • S = Severity (see table below)
  • L = Likelihood (see table below)
  • C = Class (Calculated using the Matrix of Severity and Likelihood, annex, Table A.3)
Severity Likelihood
1 = Negligible 1 = Incredible
2 = Marginal 2 = Improbable
3 = Critical 3 = Remote
4 = Catastrophic 4 = Occasional
5 = Probable
6 = Frequent

 

3. Pool entry and exit

Serial Risk Caused By S L C
1 Trips Obstacles
Trailing cables/pipes
Changes in floor level
Sloping floors
Steps into the pool
Equipment not stowed away correctly
Mats
2 4 C
2 Slips Wet floor
Wet Tadpole
Slippery surfaces
2 4 C
3 Slipping out/off of
Equipment (hoists, lift,
Shower chairs)
Wet equipment
Wet Tadpole
Equipment Misuse by Carer/Volunteer
Inexperience of Carer/Volunteer
1 4 C
4 Injury during manual
handling
Brakes not applies to shower chair
Unpredictable behaviour by Tadpole
Lack of preparation
Poor technique
1 3 D
5 Injury during lift operation Moving parts
Installation and removal
Unpredictable behaviour by Tadpole
Equipment failure
Equipment Misuse by Carer/Volunteer
Inexperience of Carer/Volunteer
1 3 D
6 Infection Soiled equipment
Poor hygiene
1 2 D
7 Injury during an emergency evacuation
of the pool
Lack of preparation
Inexperience of Carer/Volunteer
Procedures not being followed
Lack of adequate training
2 2 D
8 Other

Key:

  • S = Severity (see table below)
  • L = Likelihood (see table below)
  • C = Class (Calculated using the Matrix of Severity and Likelihood, annex, Table A.3)
Severity Likelihood
1 = Negligible 1 = Incredible
2 = Marginal 2 = Improbable
3 = Critical 3 = Remote
4 = Catastrophic 4 = Occasional
5 = Probable
6 = Frequent

 

4. Pool activity

Serial Risk Caused By S L C
1 Drowning
Aspiration
Asphyxiation
Slips
Unpredictable behaviour by
Tadpole
Medical condition, e.g.
Epilepsy
Malfunction of buoyancy aids
Misuse of buoyancy aids
Limited motor control of
Tadpole
3 2 C
2 Slips Pool floor, particularly black
lines
Slippery surfaces
2 4 C
3 Collisions Unfamiliar environment
Lack of supervision
1 4 C
4 Medical Problems Lack of supervision
Communication error
Medical records not up to
date
3 3 C
5 Injury during manual handling Unpredictable behaviour by
Tadpole
Lack of preparation
Poor technique
1 3 D
6 Infection Poor hygiene
Body fluids entering the pool
Inappropriate swimwear
1 2 D
7 Other

Key:

  • S = Severity (see table below)
  • L = Likelihood (see table below)
  • C = Class (Calculated using the Matrix of Severity and Likelihood, annex, Table A.3)
Severity Likelihood
1 = Negligible 1 = Incredible
2 = Marginal 2 = Improbable
3 = Critical 3 = Remote
4 = Catastrophic 4 = Occasional
5 = Probable
6 = Frequent

 

Risk Analysis

The final stage of the Safety Assessment process is to complete a Risk Analysis.
The following section provides the details of the status of each hazard and it’s risk classification. This Section should be read in conjunction with the Hazard Log.

The risk analysis will list the hazards in the following order:
a. Open Hazards;
b. Potential ALARP Hazards.

Open Hazards
None

Potential ALARP Hazards

 

Hazard 1.1 – Trips

This hazard has a classification C risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel tripping and sustaining injury due to:

  • Obstacles such as trailing cables/pipes and equipment not correctly stowed
  • Changes in floor level
  • Poor levels and slopes in the car park
  • Stairs
  • Changes in light levels
  • All walkways should be inspected prior to Tadpoles activity and where appropriate, equipment should be stowed away correctly. Consideration should be given to the potential for any item to form a trip hazard. On joining the club people should be given a tour, taking particular care to highlight any changes in floor level and slopes that may cause an issue. Any Tadpoles with susceptibility to balance issues should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Stairs should have suitable support rails. Lighting should be adequate.
    With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 1.2 – Slips

This hazard has a classification C risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel slipping and sustaining injury due to:

  • Wet floor
  • Slippery surfaces
  • Icy conditions
  • All walkways should be inspected prior to Tadpoles activity and where appropriate, wet surfaces should be dried, spills should be cleared and icy surfaces should be gritted. Any Tadpoles with susceptibility to balance issues should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Lighting should be adequate.

With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 1.3 – Collisions

This hazard has a classification C risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel colliding with another person or object and sustaining injury due to

  • Unfamiliar environment
  • Lack of supervision

All walkways should be inspected prior to Tadpoles activity and where appropriate, equipment should be stowed away correctly. Consideration should be given to the potential for any item to form a collision hazard. On joining the club people should be given a tour, taking particular care to highlight any obstacles that could cause a collision hazard. Any Tadpoles with spatial awareness issues should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

 

Hazard 1.4 – Manual Handling

This hazard has a classification D risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel sustaining injury during manual handling, due to:

  • Brakes not being applied to a wheelchair
  • Unpredictable behaviour of a Tadpole
  • Lack of preparation
  • Poor technique

All manual handling should be carried out using the appropriate equipment correctly. The appropriate equipment should only be used by Volunteers or Carers who are familiar with that equipment. Regular training should be given to Volunteers so they are familiar with the equipment and various techniques available. On joining the club people should be given a tour, taking particular care to highlight any equipment available to assist in manual handling. Any Tadpoles with a requirement for manual handling should be given the opportunity to provide a brief on which technique or equipment they prefer prior to each instance of manual handling. Before any manual handling is considered, an assessment should be made to choose the correct technique for the situation. Once assessed, a plan should be put in place and it should be agreed which single individual is nominated as the controller. The controller will control the preparation, timing and performance of the manual handling event. The Tadpole should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

 

Hazard 2.1 – Trips

This hazard has a classification C risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel tripping and sustaining injury due to:

  • Obstacles such as trailing cables/pipes and equipment not correctly stowed
  • Changes in floor level ? Sloping floors and stairs
  • Changes in light levels

All walkways should be inspected prior to Tadpoles activity and where appropriate, equipment should be stowed away correctly. Consideration should be given to the potential for any item to form a trip hazard. On joining the club people should be given a tour, taking particular care to highlight any changes in floor level, stairs and slopes that may cause an issue. Any Tadpoles with susceptibility to balance issues should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Stairs should have suitable support rails. Lighting should be adequate.

With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 2.2 – Slips

This hazard has a classification C risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel slipping and sustaining injury due to:

  • Wet floor
  • Slippery surfaces
  • Dirty surfaces
  • Access through shower area

All walkways should be inspected prior to Tadpoles activity and where appropriate, wet surfaces should be dried, spills should be cleared and dirty surfaces cleaned. The shower area should only be used for access when to do otherwise would cause a greater risk. Any Tadpoles with susceptibility to balance issues should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 2.3 – Collisions

This hazard has a classification C risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel colliding with another person or object and sustaining injury due to:

  • Unfamiliar environment
  • Lack of supervision
  • Members of public using the changing area during the changeover period
  • Narrow entrances for wheelchairs
  • Fire doors closing during use

All walkways should be inspected prior to Tadpoles activity and where appropriate, equipment should be stowed away correctly. Consideration should be given to the potential for any item to form a collision hazard. On joining the club people should be given a tour, taking particular care to highlight any obstacles that could cause a collision hazard. Any Tadpoles with spatial awareness issues should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Communication should be clear to ensure members of the public are aware that the Tadpole is approaching and consideration should be given to avoid collisions. Narrow walkways should be avoided when using wheelchairs. Fire doors should be held open for Tadpoles to pass through where appropriate. Fire doors must not be held open for longer than necessary. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 2.4 – Hoist Operation

This hazard has a classification D risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel sustaining injury during hoist operation, due to:

    • Moving parts
    • Unpredictable behaviour of a Tadpole
    • Equipment failure
    • Equipment misuse
    • Inexperience of Carer/Volunteer

All hoist operation should be carried using the appropriate equipment. The appropriate equipment should only be used by Volunteers or Carers who are familiar with that equipment. Regular training should be given to Volunteers so they are familiar with the equipment and various techniques available. On joining the club people should be given a tour, taking particular care to highlight any hoists. Any Tadpoles with a requirement for a hoist should be given the opportunity to provide a brief on which technique or equipment they prefer prior to each instance of hoist operation. The Tadpole should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 2.5 – Changing Bed Operation

This hazard has a classification D risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel sustaining injury during changing bed operation, due to:

  • Moving parts
  • Unpredictable behaviour of a Tadpole
  • Equipment failure
  • Equipment misuse
  • Inexperience of Carer/Volunteer

All changing bed operation should be carried using the appropriate equipment. The appropriate equipment should only be used by Volunteers or Carers who are familiar with that equipment. Regular training should be given to Volunteers so they are familiar with the equipment and various techniques available. On joining the club people should be given a tour, taking particular care to highlight any changing beds. Any Tadpoles with a requirement for a changing bed should be given the opportunity to provide a brief on which technique or equipment they prefer prior to each instance of operation. The Tadpole should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 2.6 – Slipping out/off Equipment

This hazard has a classification D risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel sustaining injury caused by slipping out of off of equipment (hoist/changing bed etc), due to:

  • Wet Equipment
  • Wet Tadpole
  • Equipment misuse
  • Inexperience of Carer/Volunteer

Equipment should be towelled down after each operation. The Tadpole should dry off any excess water before using any hoist, changing bed, or other equipment. All activities should be carried using the appropriate equipment. The appropriate equipment should only be used by Volunteers or Carers who are familiar with that equipment. Regular training should be given to Volunteers so they are familiar with the equipment and various techniques available. On joining the club people should be given a tour, taking particular care to highlight any equipment available to assist in manual handling. Any Tadpoles with a requirement for a changing bed, hoist or other equipment should be given the opportunity to provide a brief on which technique or equipment they prefer prior to each instance of operation. The Tadpole should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 2.7 – Manual Handling

This hazard has a classification D risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel sustaining injury during manual handling, due to:

  • Changing bed set to the wrong height
  • Brakes not being applied to a wheelchair
  • Unpredictable behaviour of a Tadpole
  • Lack of preparation
  • Poor technique

All manual handling should be carried using the appropriate equipment correctly. The appropriate equipment should only be used by Volunteers or Carers who are familiar with that equipment. Regular training should be given to Volunteers so they are familiar with the equipment and various techniques available. On joining the club people should be given a tour, taking particular care to highlight any equipment available to assist in manual handling. Any Tadpoles with a requirement for manual handling should be given the opportunity to provide a brief on which technique or equipment they prefer prior to each instance of manual handling. Before any manual handling is considered, an assessment should be made to choose the correct technique for the situation. Once assessed, a plan should be put in place and it should be agreed which single individual is nominated as the controller. The controller will control the preparation, timing and performance of the manual handling event. The Tadpole should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 2.8 – Scalding

This hazard has a classification D risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel sustaining injury during showering or using washbasins, due to the temperature not being correct.
All running water from either tap or shower should be tested by Volunteers or Carers prior to use by a Tadpole. If the temperature is not correct it should be adjusted by qualified personnel and a nominated Volunteer or Carer should supervise the area to ensure Tadpoles do not inadvertently use the tap or shower.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 2.9 – Infection

This hazard has a classification D risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel catching an infection due to:

  • Soiled equipment
  • Poor Hygiene
  • Outdoor shoes

All equipment should be cleaned before and after use to ensure infection is not passed from one person to another. All Volunteers and Carers should ensure appropriate hygiene is maintained at all times. Appropriate protection, e.g. gloves, aprons and facemasks, should be used at all times. Outdoor shoes should be removed before entering the changing area, or overshoes should be fitted. All wheelchair wheels should be cleaned before entering the changing area, or the Tadpole transferred to a clean, shower chair at the entrance to the changing area.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 3.1 – Trips

This hazard has a classification C risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel tripping and sustaining injury due to:

  • Obstacles such as trailing cables/pipes and equipment not correctly stowed
  • Changes in floor level
  • Sloping floors
  • Steps into the pool
  • Changes in light levels

All walkways should be inspected prior to Tadpoles activity and where appropriate, equipment should be stowed away correctly. Consideration should be given to the potential for any item to form a trip hazard. On joining the club people should be given a tour, taking particular care to highlight any changes in floor level, stairs and slopes that may cause an issue. Any Tadpoles with susceptibility to balance issues should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Steps should have suitable support rails. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 3.2 – Slips

This hazard has a classification C risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel slipping and sustaining injury due to:

  • Wet floor
  • Slippery surfaces
  • Dirty surfaces

All walkways should be inspected prior to Tadpoles activity and where appropriate, wet surfaces should be dried, spills should be cleared and dirty surfaces cleaned. The shower area should only be used for access when to do otherwise would cause a greater risk. Any Tadpoles with susceptibility to balance issues should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 3.3 – Slipping out/off Equipment

This hazard has a classification D risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel sustaining injury caused by slipping out of off of equipment (hoist/changing bed etc), due to:

    ?

  • Wet Equipment
  • Wet Tadpole
  • Equipment misuse
  • Inexperience of Carer/Volunteer

Equipment should be towelled down after each operation. The Tadpole should dry off any excess water before using any hoist, changing bed, or other equipment. All activities should be carried using the appropriate equipment. The appropriate equipment should only be used by Volunteers or Carers who are familiar with that equipment. Regular training should be given to Volunteers so they are familiar with the equipment and various techniques available. On joining the club people should be given a tour, taking particular care to highlight any equipment available to assist in manual handling. Any Tadpoles with a requirement for a changing bed, hoist or other equipment should be given the opportunity to provide a brief on which technique or equipment they prefer prior to each instance of operation. The Tadpole should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 3.4 – Manual Handling

This hazard has a classification D risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel sustaining injury during manual handling, due to:

  • Brakes not being applied to a shower chair
  • Unpredictable behaviour of a Tadpole
  • Lack of preparation
  • Poor technique

All manual handling should be carried out using the appropriate equipment correctly. The appropriate equipment should only be used by Volunteers or Carers who are familiar with that equipment. Regular training should be given to Volunteers so they are familiar with the equipment and various techniques available. On joining the club people should be given a tour, taking particular care to highlight any equipment available to assist in manual handling. Any Tadpoles with a requirement for manual handling should be given the opportunity to provide a brief on which technique or equipment they prefer prior to each instance of manual handling. Before any manual handling is considered, an assessment should be made to choose the correct technique for the situation. Once assessed, a plan should be put in place and it should be agreed which single individual is nominated as the controller. The controller will control the preparation, timing and performance of the manual handling event. The Tadpole should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 3.5 – Lift Operation

This hazard has a classification D risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel sustaining injury during lift operation, due to:

  • Moving parts
  • Installation and removal
  • Unpredictable behaviour of a Tadpole
  • Equipment failure
  • Equipment misuse
  • Inexperience of Carer/Volunteer

All lift operation should be carried out using the appropriate equipment. The appropriate equipment should only be used by Volunteers or Carers who are familiar with that equipment. Regular training should be given to Volunteers so they are familiar with the equipment and various techniques available. On joining the club people should be given a tour, taking particular care to highlight the lift. Any Tadpoles with a requirement for the lift should be given the opportunity to provide a brief on which technique or equipment they prefer prior to each instance of operation. The Tadpole should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 3.6 – Infection

This hazard has a classification D risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel catching an infection due to:

  • Soiled equipment
  • Poor Hygiene

All equipment should be cleaned before and after use to ensure infection is not passed from one person to another. All Volunteers and Carers should ensure appropriate hygiene is maintained at all times. Appropriate protection, e.g. gloves, aprons and facemasks, should be used at all times.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 3.7 – Pool Evacuation

This hazard has a classification D risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel sustaining an injury due to:

  • Lack of preparation
  • Inexperience of Carer/Volunteer
  • Procedures not being followed
  • Lack of adequate training

All Volunteers should wear red headbands to clearly identify them as Volunteers. No Tadpole should ever wear a red headband or similar garment. The Session Leader should wear a yellow and red swimcap to clearly identify them as the Session Leader. Evacuation should be in accordance with the Kings Leisure Centre Emergency Action Plan. All instructions given by the staff are to be followed. Communications should be clear concise and accurate. Only Kings Centre staff, lifeguards and the Session Leader, should give instructions to avoid confusion. Volunteers and Carers should ensure that the Tadpole under their charge is evacuated safely before assisting in the evacuation of others. Tadpoles should not be left without adequate support at any time. If there are multiple Tadpoles requiring the lift, an orderly queue should be formed. Where possible, multiple exits from the pool should be used to speed up evacuation. On evacuation, all people should make their way to the nominated assembly area and await further instructions. A nominated person should collect adequate amounts of warm material to ensure Volunteers, Carers and Tadpoles in swimwear, or indoor clothing are kept warm. In accordance with the Emergency Evacuation Plan, foil blankets will be issued by Kings Centre staff. The appropriate equipment should only be used by Volunteers or Carers who are familiar with that equipment. Regular training should be given to Volunteers so they are familiar with the equipment and various techniques available. On joining the club people should be given a tour, taking particular care to highlight the emergency exits. The Tadpole should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 4.1 – Drowning, Aspiration or Asphyxiation

This hazard has a classification C risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel drowning, aspiring or asphyxiating due to:

  • Slips in the pool
  • Unpredictable behaviour by a Tadpole
  • An existing medical condition
  • Buoyancy aid malfunction or misuse
  • Limited motor control of a Tadpole

On joining the club all Tadpoles must fill in a medical form that can be used to assess whether any existing medical conditions could cause an increased risk of drowning, aspiring or asphyxiating. All Tadpoles should be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area and any medical condition that could increase the risk of drowning, aspiring or asphyxiating whilst using the pool. Where appropriate, more than one Volunteer or Carer should be nominated to escort and support a Tadpole. If a Tadpole, Volunteer or Carer gets into difficulty, the Kings Leisure Centre Pool Emergency Rescue Procedure should be put into place. This can be found in the Kings Leisure Centre Emergency Action Plan. Any Tadpoles with susceptibility to balance or motor control issues should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Steps should have suitable support rails. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 4.2 – Slips

This hazard has a classification C risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel slipping and sustaining injury due to:

  • Slippery pool floor, especially the black lines
  • Slippery surfaces

Tadpoles who walk in the pool should be briefed to be careful of the black lines, as they can be slippery. All walking should be done away from the edge of the pool to avoid an impact with the pool edge should a slip occur. All Tadpoles walking in the pool should be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer, or supervised by a Volunteer or Carer on the poolside. Any Tadpoles with susceptibility to balance issues should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

4.3 – Collisions

This hazard has a classification C risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel colliding with another person or object and sustaining injury due to:

  • Unfamiliar environment
  • Lack of supervision

Consideration should be given to the potential for any item to form a collision hazard. On joining the club people should be given a tour, taking particular care to highlight any obstacles that could cause a collision hazard. When swimming Volunteers and Carers should ensure the Tadpole is not swimming close to any object or other Tadpoles. Close supervision and forward planning is essential. Where appropriate, a Volunteer or Carer should put themselves between the Tadpole and the possible object or person that the Tadpole could collide with to avoid injury to the Tadpole. Any Tadpoles with spatial awareness issues should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Narrow walkways should be avoided when using wheelchairs. Fire doors should be held open for Tadpoles to pass through where appropriate. Fire doors must not be held open for longer than necessary. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 4.4 – Medical Issues

This hazard has a classification C risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel suffering from a medical issue whilst in the pool due to:

  • Lack of supervision
  • Communications error
  • Records not up to date

On joining the club all Tadpoles must fill in a medical form that can be used to assess whether any existing medical conditions could cause an issue whilst in the pool. All Tadpoles should be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area and any medical condition that could increase the risk to the Tadpole, Volunteer or Carer whilst using the pool. Where appropriate, more than one Volunteer or Carer should be nominated to escort and support a Tadpole. The  Kings Leisure Centre Lifeguard is to be informed of any Tadpoles, Volunteers or Carers who are diagnosed with a Heart Condition or Epilepsy. If a Tadpole, Volunteer or Carer gets into difficulty, the Kings Leisure Centre Pool Emergency Rescue Procedure should be put into place.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 4.5 – Manual Handling

This hazard has a classification D risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel sustaining injury during manual handling, due to:

  • Unpredictable behaviour of a Tadpole
  • Lack of preparation
  • Poor technique

All manual handling should be carried out using the appropriate equipment correctly. The appropriate equipment should only be used by Volunteers or Carers who are familiar with that equipment. Regular training should be given to Volunteers so they are familiar with the equipment and various techniques available. On joining the club people should be given a tour, taking particular care to highlight any equipment available to assist in manual handling. Any Tadpoles with a requirement for manual handling should be given the opportunity to provide a brief on which technique or equipment they prefer prior to each instance of manual handling. Before any manual handling is considered, an assessment should be made to choose the correct technique for the situation. Once assessed, a plan should be put in place and it should be agreed which single individual is nominated as the controller. The controller will control the preparation, timing and performance of the manual handling event. The Tadpole should use appropriate support and be escorted by a Volunteer or Carer who is familiar with the area. Lighting should be adequate.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Hazard 4.6 – Infection

This hazard has a classification D risk to people. The hazard concerns the risk of personnel catching an infection due to:

  • Poor hygiene
  • Body fluids entering the pool
  • Inappropriate swimwear

All Volunteers and Carers should ensure appropriate hygiene is maintained at all times. Appropriate protection, e.g. gloves, aprons and face-masks, should be used at all times. If body fluids enter the pool, immediately inform a member of Kings Centre staff who will carry out the appropriate action, outlined in the Kings Leisure Centre Emergency Action Plan. All Tadpoles, Carers and Volunteers are to ensure appropriate swimwear is worn, especially where continence is an issue. Any Tadpole, Volunteer or Carer with an open wound is not to be allowed into the pool. The poolside supervisor is to visually inspect all Tadpoles, Volunteers and Carers for visible open wounds as they prepare to enter the pool.
With the existing safeguards and there being no further practicable safeguards and controls, the residual risk from this hazard has the potential to be ALARP and Tolerable.

Conclusions and Recommendations

Conclusions

A systematic safety assessment of the Tadpoles activities has been completed, comprising Hazard Identification, Risk Assessment and Risk Analysis.
Of the twenty-six identified hazards, all have the potential to be declared ALARP and either Broadly Acceptable or Tolerable, however, all stakeholders should review the Hazard Log to consider if any other reasonably practicable risk control and safeguard can be added to those that have already been identified.
A breakdown of the twenty six identified hazards shows that none attained a Class A or Class B risk. Thirteen hazards have attained Class C risks and thirteen have attained Class D risks.
The report concludes that whilst a comprehensive risk management process has been completed, continuous risk management effort is required. This report concludes that the risks have the potential to be declared ALARP and either Broadly Acceptable or Tolerable.

Recommendations

The following recommendations should be implemented at the earliest opportunity:

None

Annex A

Accident Severity Definitions

The team assessed the most likely resultant severity of the identified hazards based on the definitions given in Table A.1. In the first instance, this assumed the worst-case scenario before taking into account any mitigation.

Accident Category Definition
Catastrophic Multiple deaths
Critical A single death; and/or multiple severe
injuries or severe
occupational illnesses
Marginal A single severe injury or occupational
illness; and/or multiple minor injuries or
minor occupational illnesses
Negligible At most a single minor
injury or minor occupational illness

Table A.1: Severity Definitions

Accident Likelihood Definitions

The team assessed the likelihood of the identified hazard occurring based on the definitions given in Table A.2.

Accident Likelihood Occurrence during operational life
considering all instances of the system
Frequent Likely to be continually experienced
Probable Likely to occur often
Occasional Likely to occur several times
Remote Likely to occur some time
Improbable Unlikely, but may exceptionally occur
Incredible Extremely unlikely that the event will occur
at all

Table A.2: Likelihood Definitions

Risk Classification

The Risk Classification is the combination of the severity and likelihood, and allows the risk to be classified and subsequently ranked for risk management activity. The Risk Classification Matrix is displayed In Table A.3.

ImprobableCCDDIncredibleCDDD

Likelihood Accident Severity
Catastrophic Critical Marginal Negligible
Frequent A A A B
Probable A A B C
Occasional A B C C
Remote B C D D

Table A.3: Risk Classification Matrix

Tolerability of Risk

Risk Classifications, together with a description of their tolerability are shown in Table A.4.

Risk Class Interpretation
A Intolerable unless there are exceptional reasons for the activity to take
place
B Undesirable, and shall only be accepted if risk reduction is
impracticable
C Tolerable with the endorsement of the Safety Review Committee
D Tolerable with the endorsement by of the normal safety reviews

Table A.4: Tolerabilty Definitions